Work life balance

Work life Balance – is it really possible?

Many of us feel we are struggling to juggle different aspects of our lives and also feel that this is an essential part of modern life and guilty if we can’t maintain it. Is it possible to keep work, relationships, carer responsibilities, fitness, fun and more in balance? Or are we aiming for the unattainable? The following articles discuss the issue from different angles and viewpoints.

The secret to work-life balance is to stop balancing

Karen Meager and John McLachlan, People Management

The authors of this blog article feel that we should stop balancing and find a rhythm that suits our individual lives. A big part of this is to stop trying to multi-task and to start reviewing and prioritising properly. I like that they suggest that we try changing small things to see if they work for us first rather than going all out, failing, and going back to the old way by default.

For the full article by Karen Meager and John McLachlan, click here.

Ten tips for a better work-life balance

Stuart Jeffries, The Guardian

Offering 10 ideas on how we can make small changes to our lives and, more importantly, our attitude to work demands, Stuart Jeffries is pragmatic about  how realistic the ‘work life balance’ is. One of the quotes that speaks to me most from this article is about ‘Set Your Own Rules’;  “The important thing is to ignore the shoulds – the shoulds that comes from other people or from you internalising others’ mindsets. You have to rely on your own intuition.” Well said!

For the full article by Stuart Jeffries, click here.

Work-life balance: What does it mean for men?

Helen Morrisey, BBC Business

We hear a lot more about what work life balance means for women than men and the media is very vocal about combining family and career but this is generally from the female viewpoint. This piece by Helen is refreshing in that she talks to men about their work life balance with insights from her own life with her partner who is the main child-care provider in the household.

For the full article, click here

Work life balance quiz

Canadian Mental Health Association

If you enjoy doing quick quizzes, we’ve found this one from the Canadian Mental Health Association asking 15 yes/no questions about work-life and gives some tips with the score at the end. Very clearly not scientific, the quiz can be a quick guide on where you are.  To take the test, click here 

 

Advanced clinical training

Advanced Clinical Training Days – a new CPD opportunity

Advanced Clinical Training Days

We are offering experienced therapists an opportunity to join our Advanced Clinical Training days – joining our advanced students on the theory elements of the TA Training programme. Attendees will spend a day considering advanced counsell
ing and psychotherapy theory on specific topics in a warm, welcoming and relaxed setting – a great basis for getting involved in engaging discussions and thinking around a theory topic.
“It’s great to be able to spend a day in the comfort of the The Horsforth Centre and engage with like-minded therapy colleagues, thinking about advanced topics”

Who can attend ?

Advanced Clinical Training days are open to:

– Qualified counsellors who have completed a Diploma qualification
– Practitioners who have two years of clinical experience
– Experienced counsellors, experienced psychotherapists, clinical psychologist advanced trainees and qualified, mental health professionals, CBT practitioners, EMDR advanced practitioners
– Practitioners who are ready to access advanced clinical TA and integrative theory

Seminar programme

Dates are roughly 1 per month during the academic year. Each course can be booked individually. Each day’s attendance costs £75. See below for more details of dates and topics.

The day starts at 9.30am and finishes at 4.30pm with a one hour lunch break and session breaks.

15th October 2016: The Therapeutic Relationship

19th November 2016: Working with Obsessive Compulsive Clients

17th December 2016:  Psychodynamic Modality

14th January 2017:  The Schizoid Defensive Structure

18th February 2017: Memory and the Brain

20th May 2017:  Humanistic Theory

24th June 2017:  Borderline and Narcissistic Traits

8th July 2017:  Body and Embodiment*

More information

For more information or to book on the Advanced Clinical Training days, click here.

 

 

TA101 image

New TA101 course dates: 16 & 17 July

Great news! New dates released!

We’ve got a new Introduction to Transactional Analysis (TA101) course coming up in July  – on 16th and 17th.

If you missed out on a place on the June course or would like to join a course before the summer, you can book your tickets now.

For more information, click the link below.

The TA101 can also be called Understanding Yourself and Others since it is for those wanting to explore communication and relationships. The TA101 is also the first stage in TA Training.

Who is this course for?
Anyone wanting to understand themselves and others better.
People from organisations interested in communication and team dynamics
People thinking about counselling and therapy as a career.
Teachers and parents interested in child development.
Mental health workers seeking new ways of understanding clients.
Counsellors & therapists interested in TA
Anyone wanting to understand themselves and others better.
People from organisations interested in communication and team dynamics
People thinking about counselling and therapy as a career.
Teachers and parents interested in child development.
Mental health workers seeking new ways of understanding clients.
Counsellors & therapists interested in TA

More information

Free Evening Seminar: Using Supervision Creatively 11 June 2016

This months free evening seminar is on the subject of Using Supervision Creatively – How to get the best from the supervisory space

What is the seminar about?cpd image

Are you interested in exploring how to get the most from supervision sessions? Do you want to use the time and space more effectively?

Do you ever wonder if you are getting the best out of the supervisory space?

This workshop will invite reflection on how delegates might creatively make use of supervision in order to strengthen their practice including issues such as “How do I best prepare for supervision?”.

Attendees will be invited to consider how to apply the learning to their own professional setting as counsellor, psychotherapist, coach, professional or mental health worker.

Doors open at 5.00pm with drinks and nibbles with the seminar starting at 5.30pm. The seminar is approx 90 mins and finishes at 7.00pm. You don’t need to book – just turn up on the day.

The seminar is run by Andy Williams, an experienced therapist, trainer and supervisor.

Supervision maze

Supervision and Professional Development Day – Fri 10 June

The next Supervision Day is coming up on Friday 10 June and is an ideal opportunity for some intensive supervision or as an environment to discuss a particular issue in more depth. The day is open to counsellors and therapists from all modalities and is a confidential forum where you can take time out to reflect on your practice whilst taking away positive input from others.

Many therapists work alone and feel a little out on a limb. If this is you or feel you are in need of specialist support, our Supervision Days are for you.

 

What can I take away?

Some examples of things you could take away from the day are:

  • Tools or approaches to help you develop your work
  • Guidance or advice on a specific situation or an approach you are taking with a client
  • Assistant and support for tricky or ethical situations
  • A chance to review your client work from a particular perspective

 

How does the day work?

The workshop is an agenda day – meaning that the particpants set the agenda for the day. There will be opportunities for supervision of client work, theory teaching, ethical and professional practice discussions and preparations for examinations.

 

 

Who is the day for?

For counsellors and therapists from all modalities these workshops provide an excellent chance to explore using transactional analysis in your practice as well as bringing client work for supervision to explore and understand the application of theory to practice.

For trainees in transactional analysis the days provide an opportunity for additional supervision and for those going to Diploma or CTA, opportunity for exam preparation.

 

What are the dates for 2016?

Dates for 2016 are 10 June, 16 September, 18 November.

 

And finally……..

These are drop-in groups, running once every two months. If there are eight or more people then there will be two trainers.  The cost of the day is £70. Lunch is not provided but drinks and tea break refreshments are included. To book your place, click here or go to our Training & Events page.

Working with Risk and Suicidality in Private Practice – 1 day workshop – Fri 6 May

At times every counsellor and psychotherapist becomes anxious about working with suicidal risk – especially in a private practice setting. This workshop will equip you with the skills and models of appropriate risk assessment for suicidal clients. It will enable you to make your risk assessment more robust and will explore the psychodynamic nature of suicidality.

The day can also include an element of direct application to your own practice with the opportunity to bring your own practice cases or issues for supervision and discussion if you wish.

The cost of the course is £75.

Following attendance of this course (min 6 hours) you will be awarded with a CPD certificate.

The day runs from 9.30am to 4.30pm and includes drinks and refreshments. Lunch is not included.

To book a place on the course, click here to go to the booking site or use the link from our Training and Events page

About the presenter

Andy Williams

Andy is a UKCP Registered Psychotherapist, Certified Transactional Analyst and qualified CBT therapist. He has many years experience working as a therapist within the NHS and also runs his own private practice of individuals, couples and groups.

Free Evening Seminar: Creativity in Therapy and Counselling – 9 April, 5 – 7pm

This months free evening seminar is on the subject of creativity.

Are you interested in exploring how we can use creativity to enhance our practice? You may also be considering the role creativity can play in promoting client growth and what ‘creativity’ means in this setting.


The seminar is run by Lin Cheung, a psychotherapist and artist. She explains “As an artist and psychotherapist I am interested the creative processes in psychotherapy and counselling and how we can liberate creative energy in the service of personal development, growth and health.”

Lin will present a model of creativity, with opportunity for exercises linked to creativity and lots of discussion about what we can learn from these experiences.

Doors open at 5.00pm with drinks and nibbles with the seminar starting at 5.30pm. The seminar is approx 90 mins and finishes at 7.00pm. You don’t need to book – just turn up on the day.

The seminar is run by Lin Cheung, an experienced therapist, trainer and supervisor and artist.

In the news……

Wellbeing stories that have come up in the last week.

Better mental health awareness in schools

A campaign for universal access to school-based counselling services was launched by teachers yesterday, at the Association of Teachers and Lecturers annual conference as union leaders warned of the stress of a test-focused curriculum and a one size fits all approach to education.

http://schoolsweek.co.uk/mental-health-counselling-campaign-launches-as-union-warns-of-pupil-stress/


Research on the benefits of exercise for those in sedentary jobs

The University of Leicester researchers have been looking into the benefits of exercise – and particulary those of us in jobs requiring a lot of time sitting.

The paper published in BMC Public Health has show that being physically active may offset some of the deleterious consequences of spending large amounts of time not being active including effects on mental health.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-04/uol-ecs040516.php


Whether or not to challenge language about mental health

In the Guardian this week, Clare Allan writes about how important words are and the tensions of whether to challenge misused language and changing attitudes in the media.

Coming up: Supervision Day 15 April 2016

 

Supervision and Professional Development Days

Running as a drop-in group and taking place every other month, the Supervision and Professional Development Day give the opportunity for additional CPD and supervision for counsellors and therapists from all modalities.

We run the Supervision Day as an agenda day where the particpants bring issues which then set the agenda – much like a regular supervision group. Attendees are split into small groups of up to 8 to give the best opportunity for each person to get the most from the day. Issues to bring can include supervision of client work, theory teaching, ethical and professional practice discussions and preparations for examinations.

Who is the day for?

If you are a counsellor or therapist from any modality, these workshops provide an excellent chance bring client work for supervision and to explore and understand the application of theory to practice.

For trainees in transactional analysis the days provide an opportunity for additional supervision and for those going to Diploma or CTA, opportunity for exam preparation.

A little more detail…

These are drop-in groups, running once every two months. If there are eight or more people then there will be two facilitators/supervisors. The cost of the day is £70. Lunch is not provided but drinks and tea break refreshments are included.

To book your place on April 15th Supervision Day go to the Training and Events page or click here or go to the booking site

In the news……

 

Stephen Fry has been talking openly about mental health for some years now – this is a very good thing.

The Spectator this week has published an article from Professor Richard Bentall – one of Stephen’s school contemporaries“What I wish Stephen Fry understood about mental health”,
trying to put a more contextual view of mental health and treatment.

The piece is in the form of a letter, supportive and respectful, but also giving emphasis to considering circumstances which can affect mental health or exacerbate symptoms.

Mental health problems aren’t all in the brain

Clare Allan has been saying something similar in The Guardian with her article “Mental health problems aren’t all in the brain” commenting on the BBC’s Mind series of programmes and expressing concern about the apparent lack of discussion about the impact of the social context and individual’s stories and histories on mental health issues. Clare continues that “In failing to represent their (individual’s) perspective, the BBC has not only presented an extremely one-sided picture, it has broadcast a message to such individuals, and to society generally, that their experience doesn’t matter.”

What do you think about this argument? How important do you think an individual’s circumstances are to their mental well being?

BME access to mental health services

A report from a discussion by the Lords about BME access to mental health treatment. Comments made included a point about the need to look carefully at the most appropriate treatment for an individual and not a broad brush approach.

Find a more detailed report by clicking on the title link above.